Pentland Pootling

The Pentland Hills lay just beyond my radius when I was living on the border, so I was glad when a walking friend offered to introduce me to this lovely area in January of this year. The area is a straightforward bus journey from Edinburgh. I was just on the verge of venturing out to feature the area on this blog when the restrictions were introduced, so this is just a taster of an area I hope to focus on in future posts. I hope you are safe and well.

This post was created from my phone so I hope the layout is without issues.

Does the world need another review of 2017?

Summary.

The answer is probably not, so I’m keeping it short. Like most years, 2017 has had it’s ups and downs for me. I have achieved many of the aims for Rucksack Rose that I set out a year ago; completely updating all my sites, introducing a way to support me and producing more regular content, which includes ‘talkie’ videos and GPX links.

Outdoor
rucksackrose.com

In April, under pressure from Twitter trolls, I wrote a bit about my childhood experiences of aggression, and the ways in which I learned to cope with them, in Overcoming Anxiety. I can only hope that writing about this may help others who have had similar experiences.

In September I celebrated the fifth birthday of this blog and passing the 100k views mark on both my YouTube channel and my blog. I am proud to say that views currently stand at 108k+ on YouTube and 107k+ on this blog.

RR Thanks
Thank You from Rucksack Rose

In spite of these successes, responses to supporting me have been muted although I realise that competition is pretty fierce in this area. Thanks to the companies who have sent products for me to look at and try out and I hope it is onward and upwards for you in 2018.

Pictures.

My achievements over the last year included completing my first solo wild camp in January to Shillhope Law in Upper Coquetdale, Northumberland.

Sunrise from Shillhope Law
Sunrise from Shillhope Law, Northumberland in winter

I also completed two backpacked trails – the Berwickshire Coastal Path in March..

Sunrise near Eyemouth
Sunrise near Eyemouth on the Berwickshire Coastal Path
Eyemouth Port
Eyemouth Port, Berwickshire

… and the Speyside Way in May.

Cairngorms
Looking towards the Cairngorms from the Speyside Way near Aviemore
Fochabers
Near Fochabers on the Speyside Way

I did two shorter camping trips; Pitcarmick on the Cateran Trail in June, and Bealach Cumhang on the Rob Roy Way in August, both of which featured a lot of rain.

Blackcraig Forest
Views from Blackcraig Forest on the Cateran Trail
Camp site
Bealach Cumhang Camp on The Rob Roy Way

In between these trails and camping trips, I also managed some lovely day walks in North Northumberland and the Scottish Borders when I began experimenting with ‘talkie” videos. This featured some very loud wind drowning out my speech, until a friend suggested a microphone.

Tweed and Till
First live video: Confluence of the River Tweed and the River Till

For those who like to keep count, I did a total of 11 wild camps this year before Lyme disease took hold. The second half of the year was quieter, as the prolonged symptoms required two courses of antibiotics.

In order to have some off-grid time, I did some outdoor volunteer work at North Perthshire in October. During this rewarding trip, I learned a lot about the ecology, history and stewardship of the three sites where I worked, as well as meeting some great people.

Garry Bridge
Voluntary work in North Perthshire: View from Garry Bridge, Linn of Tummel
Killiecrankie
Trooper’s Den at Killiecrankie
Linn of Tummel Falls
Waterfall at Linn of Tummel viewpoint

Since then I have been focussing on writing, photography, editing, adding to and improving my GPX routes, various site improvements and spending less time on social media.

2018.

This year I have realised that my outdoor life is essentially a reflective place and a sanctuary in which to recover, recharge and renew. I therefore wish my supporters and my genuine followers and readers a happy and tranquil New Year filled only with positive people.

RR New Year 2017

Top Twelve Tomes 📚

As the gift season is upon us again, I thought it would be a timely moment to mention a few top new and classic outdoor and adventure books for the reader in your life, or indeed for you.

Bookshelf
Outdoor Book Shelfie

Outdoor & Adventure Books
(In alphabetical order)

  • Walking Home: Travels with a troubadour on the Pennine Way by Simon Armitage
  • Blind Descent: Surviving alone and blind on Mount Everest by Brian Dickinson.
  • The Last Englishman: A 2,650 mile hiking adventure on the Pacific Crest Trail by Keith Foskett
  • Balancing on Blue by Keith Foskett
  • Into Thin Air: An account of the Everest disaster by Jon Krakauer
  • Mountains of the Mind by Robert MacFarlane
  • The Lost Words by Robert MacFarlane
  • Ramble On: The story of our love for walking in Great Britain by Sinclair McKay
  • Touching the Void by Joe Simpson
  • Wild: A Journey from Lost to Found by Cheryl Strayed
  • Rattlesnakes and Bald Eagles: Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail by Chris Townsend
  • Out There by Chris Townsend

Happy Reading
Happy Reading

Rose 🌹📚

Rucksack Rosie at 5

On 17th September this year it was 5 years since I began to create Rucksack Rosie on this blog and YouTube. For those who don’t know, Rucksack Rosie was originally dedicated to my mum, and was intended to share the good and simple things in the outdoor world such as beauty and kindness.

RR5
Rucksack Rosie 5th Birthday

I had great plans for this fifth year but bullying by a small group of Twitter trolls laid waste to some of them, which was a very sad moment for me and for this blog. Anyway, having taken advice, I am pressing on. Can I simply ask that if you don’t respect me, my content or my aims, you just unfollow. It’s really not that difficult.

Anyway, to those who have stuck by me for all or some of the last five years for the right reasons, I would like to say a big thank you for over 101k YouTube views, 103k blog views, as well as your advice and inspiration. I genuinely appreciate all these things and I will continue to try and keep to the original intentions of the blog which are outlined in the About this Site section.

RR Thanks
Rucksack Rosie Thank You

Happy Hiking. Rosie🌹

Waterfall walks in Northumberland

I always enjoy walking by water, as I find it very relaxing, so I thought I’d include a feature on some of the Waterfall Walks in Northumberland. Clockwise in the picture are; Hareshaw Linn in the North Tyne Valley, Linhope Spout in the Breamish Valley, and Hen Hole and Hethpool Linn in the College Valley.

Northumberland often uses the Gaelic word ‘linne’ as Linn, to indicate a pool formed at the base of a waterfall such as Hareshaw Linn and Hethpool Linn. ‘Spout’, also used, is indicative of the physical features of the waterfall. Read up on how to get to these four waterfalls on walks to suit all abilities, each with the reward of a tranquil focal point at which to stop and rest or camp.

Waterfalls in Northumberland.
Waterfalls in Northumberland.

Happy Birthday to You

I have just realised that it is the fourth birthday of Rucksack Rosie this week so I just wanted to say that those four years have opened up the unique world of the outdoors to me as a some time solitary walker in the northern Cheviot Hills, a solitary part of the country.

Rucksack Rose - First Avatars
Rucksack Rosie – First Avatars

I guess we all like to feel part of a community and the outdoors community, from the participants to the trail angels and accommodation providers, are mostly a good bunch of people. I recently returned to full time education for a year and attempted to reduce the time I spent on walking and blogging, but I found that I missed it. So Happy Birthday to you and a thanks for supporting me, my blog, and my video walk records, and for sharing your knowledge and experience with me.

Rucksack Rose - Fourth Birthday
Rucksack Rosie – Fourth Birthday

The Great Escape

I finally made it into the hills again! This raised my spirits so much that I sang loudly in my little hire car as I neared my destination in the Breamish Valley, Northumberland for a wild weekend of breathtaking scenery, drover’s roads, roman forts, ruined shepherd cottages, prehistoric burial cists, waterfalls, sunshine, serenity and some fierce battles with the local bracken. Read who won in my latest trip report at Beautiful Breamish.

Good paths heading north to Ingram
Good paths heading north to Ingram
Salters Road looking west towards Low Blakehope
Salters Road looking west towards Low Blakehope
Ruins of Blawearie Cottage
Ruins of Blawearie Cottage

See and hear more about this trip at Beautiful Breamish

Rose. August 2016.

Edinburgh Microadventure

Sometimes in life we have to make the most of where we are, and the time and the resources available to us, and these dictate our adventures more than our daydreams and long term plans. So a couple of days in Edinburgh is to me the equivalent of an expedition to the Matterhorn in terms of the escapism it affords at the moment. As I spent a while living in London, I have learned to appreciate urban walking and green spaces, and how much they can add to the quality of life in a large city.

A recent trip to Edinburgh became an adventure as I decided on the train to finally climb up the crags to Arthur’s Seat, and experience this familiar city from a new angle.

The views across Edinburgh and out onto the Firth of Forth just get better and better as you go, so don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today. This walk is written up in Edinburgh Exploits

A day with Terry Abraham

The chance to part with a small amount of money when Terry set up his fundraising page for his current film about Scafell Pike, was a way to demonstrate my faith in his abilities as a film maker and to pick his experienced brains about wild camping.

wasdale
Camping in Wasdale

Terry has assembled a huge cast of characters for  “The Life of a Mountain – Scafell Pike”, from mountaineers to mountain rescue, farmers and a shepherdess. All have a connection to Scafell Pike and the narrative of the film explores these connections. Terry’s ambition was to film a year in the life of the mountain which is the highest peak in England and one of three of the highest in the UK.

I travelled to Nether Wasdale in the Lake District to spend a day with three of the National Trust Rangers responsible for maintaining the hugely popular route up to Scafell Pike. Apparently 40,000 people, including many 3 peaks challenge teams, take this route each year and the footpath is key to their success.

Fix the Fells Rangers

Terry and the Rangers filmed a day at work on the route to the summit during April. Although there were many signs of spring on the lower part of the route, the summit was still shrouded in low cloud.

I met all sorts of people during the day, from young children to a 79 year old man, who said this was going to be his last climb. All these people made me realise what universal and enduring appeal this mountain has.

Daffodils at Wasdale

The Scafell Pike film generated a lot of interest within the outdoors community following the fundraising drive and Terry’s previous Cairngorms film with Chris Townsend in 2013 (which received a commendation at the Kendal Mountain Festival).

I feel certain that the project will bring Terry the recognition he deserves. The film premiered at Rheged in Penrith on Saturday 10th May 2014 and tickets quickly sold out for the first screening. The download / dvd are available online. An abridged version of the film was shown on the BBC4 on 14th January 2015 to record audiences.

Best long distance trail results

Well, hikers have spoken. Following a brainstorming session on social media, I created a poll of polls (below) in which people were invited to nominate and vote for their top 3 international long distance trails.

As you can see from my previous post, the shortlist included trails from all over the world, including the USA, New Zealand, Scotland, France and Turkey. The picture below shows the results on the closing date, but please feel free to continue voting.

The top five long distance trails as voted for by readers
The top five long distance trails as voted for by readers

Unfortunately some of the less well known trails like the GR5 (Netherlands to the Mediterranean) and the Lycian Way in Turkey didn’t fare so well in the poll, but perhaps that was to be expected.

In the end the poll was just for fun and I hope you enjoyed taking part.